Notre-Dame de Paris | symbolreader

by symbolreader
The gargoyles and all the other figures of Notre-Dame possess one very strange property: beside them people cannot be drawn, painted or photographed; beside them people appear dead, expressionless stone images.”

In “Civilization,” a classic TV series of 1969, standing in front of Notre-Dame, Kenneth Clark asked: “What is civilization? I don’t know. I can’t define it in abstract terms — yet. But I think I c…

“The gargoyles and other figures of Notre Dame transmit to us the psychological ideas of its builders, chiefly the idea of the complexity of the soul. These figures are the soul of Notre Dame, its different ‘I’s: pensive, melancholy, watching, derisive, malignant, absorbed in themselves, devouring something, looking intensely into a distance invisible to us, as does the strange woman in the headdress of a nun, which can be seen above the capitals of the columns of a small turret high up on the south side of the cathedral. …

The gargoyles and all the other figures of Notre-Dame possess one very strange property: beside them people cannot be drawn, painted or photographed; beside them people appear dead, expressionless stone images.”

Source and full article: Notre-Dame de Paris | symbolreader

The Dark Night of the Soul – Manly Palmer Hall

Man’s Instinctive Search for Reality

More than three hundred years ago, a Spanish mystic, San Juan de la Cruz, St. John of the Cross, wrote an extraordinary book, entitled “The Dark Night of the Soul.”

Though comparatively unknown to the modem reader, this is perhaps one of the greatest documents in Christian symbolism on a mystical level.
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Man’s Instinctive Search for Reality
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More than three hundred years ago, a Spanish mystic, San Juan de la Cruz, St. John of the Cross, wrote an extraordinary book, entitled “The Dark Night of the Soul.”
~
Though comparatively unknown to the modem reader, this is perhaps one of the greatest documents in Christian symbolism on a mystical level.
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